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Code: CG-AA28103    Add to wishlist
Price: $59.95
Status: FEB 2019 RE-STOCK

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Corgi Aviation Archive Collector Series AA28103
Curtiss Tomahawk Mk II Diecast Model
RAF No.112 Sqn, AK402, Neville Duke, Fort Maddalena, Libya, November 1941

Limited Edition
1500
Pieces Worldwide

1:72 Scale   Length   Width
Curtiss Tomahawk Mk II   5.5"   6.25"


PLEASE NOTE: This item has a planned arrival date of February 2019 and is only available for PRE-ORDER at this time.
  1. Orders are not shipped until complete. If you wish to receive in-stock items prior to pre-ordered items, you must place separate orders.
  2. Arrival dates are subject to change. Consider them to be estimates as manufacturers frequently revise them.
  3. Credit Cards are not billed until time of shipment. Check or PayPal payment (not recommended) is required at time of order.

The Curtiss P-40 series of fighters may not be regarded amongst the most successful of WWII, but as Europe fell to the advancing Wehrmacht and Britain and her Commonwealth fought to stem the German tide, it is difficult to think of a more important aircraft on both sides of the Atlantic. A capable and well-built fighter, the Curtiss P-40 was easy to maintain and operate and relatively cheap to produce crucially, it was in full scale production by the time WWII began. Despite the fact that the Curtiss P-40 was one of the most advanced American fighters in service at the outbreak of WWII, it would be the Royal Air Force that gave the aircraft its combat introduction. Early RAF Tomahawks (the British name for the P-40B) were not deemed suitable for fighter operations against the Luftwaffe and were initially used in Army cooperation and reconnaissance roles, operating from bases in the UK. The RAF made a number of suggestions to Curtiss following their experiences with these early machines and a number of improvements were incorporated into the next aircraft deliveries. This resulted in the Desert Air Force receiving Tomahawks in 1941 as replacements for their Hurricanes and being hurled into battle against Axis air forces.

It was also in the desert that the RAF Tomahawks became some of the most famous aircraft of the entire war, as No.112 Squadron pilots painted sinister looking sharks teeth and eyes behind the propellers of their P-40s, giving the aircraft an extremely aggressive appearance. The profile of these early RAF Tomahawks really does resemble that of a shark, a fact that was fully exploited by the pilots of the Desert Air Force. Impressed by magazine pictures of these RAF flying sharks, the famous American Volunteer Group 'Flying Tigers' soon added sharks teeth designs to their own P-40s as they battled Japanese aircraft in the skies above China.

This particular Curtiss Tomahawk was the mount of famous RAF pilot Neville Duke, who was posted to No.112 Squadron in North Africa following a successful spell as Wing Commander 'Sailor' Malan's wingman at Biggin Hill. Used to flying the Spitfire Mk.V, Duke initially found the Tomahawk to be something of a disappointment in combat and was shot down twice during his first few weeks in the desert. Flying Tomahawk IIB AK402, he was shot down on 30th November 1941 by high scoring JG27 ace Otto Schulz, but managed to crash land his aircraft and return to his Squadron. He soon got to grips with the desert air war and started to score victories of his own by the end of the war, Duke became the highest scoring Allied ace in the Mediterranean Theatre, with 27 victories to his name. We also went on to become a celebrated test pilot and holder of the world air speed record.

Curtiss Tomahawk Mk II

Designed to meet a USAAC requirement for a pursuit aircraft, the P-40 Warhawk was first flown on October 14th, 1938. This aircraft was tough, virtually trouble-free and saw continual improvements to arms, armor and engines. The P-40 served in numerous combat areas; often outclassed by its adversaries in speed, maneuverability and rate of climb, it earned a reputation for extreme ruggedness. Its strong construction, heavy firepower, and ability to dive enabled it to compete with enemy fighters, and it was a formidable ground-attack aircraft. P-40s were also flown by the famed Flying Tigers against the Japanese in China.

Copyright 2003-2019 The Flying Mule, Inc.

Corgi Aviation Archive Collector Series

The Corgi "Aviation Archive" range presents highly-detailed, ready-made diecast models of military and civilian aircraft. The vast Aviation Archive range has become the standard by which all other diecast airplane ranges are judged. Each Corgi model is based on a specific aircraft from an important historical or modern era of flight, and has been authentically detailed from original documents and archival library material. Famous airplanes and aviators from both military and commercial airline aviation are all honored.

Corgi "Aviation Archive" diecast airplanes feature:

  • Diecast metal construction with some plastic components.
  • Realistic panel lines, antennas, access panels and surface details.
  • Pad printed markings and placards that won't fade or peel like decals.
  • Interchangeable extended/retracted landing gear with rotating wheels.
  • Poseable presention stand to display the aircraft "in flight".
  • Many limited editions with numbered certificate of authenticity.
  • Detailed, hand-painted pilot and crew member figures.
  • Authentic detachable ordnance loads complete with placards.
  • Selected interchangeable features such as speed-brakes, opened canopies and access panels.
  • Selected moving parts such as gun turrets, control surfaces and swing-wings.

Copyright 2003-2019 The Flying Mule, Inc.

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